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Rohingya Crisis Appeal

How you've helped

Thank you so much for supporting our Rohingya Crisis Appeal. You’re playing a vital role in our response to what is now the world’s fastest-growing refugee crisis. Keep reading to find out more about how you're helping us reach children affected by the crisis.

Looking back

In September 2017, we launched our Rohingya Crisis Appeal in response to an urgent and rapidly-growing emergency. 

Following the attacks in late August and onwards in Myanmar's Rakhine State, we saw an influx of Rohingya people fleeing southeast, across the border into Bangladesh. 

There were already a large number of Rohingya who had fled over previous weeks, months and years. There are now nearly 1 million Rohingya refugees in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, over half of whom are children.

 

Tofayel is just one year old. His mother was forced to flee Myanmar when their village was attacked.

Tofayel is just one year old. His mother was forced to flee Myanmar when their village was attacked.

Thanks to you...

We already had a presence in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Thanks to you, we've been able to react incredibly quickly to the emergency, scaling up our response to try and meet the vast number of children who have needed our help. 

 

We've reached 54,533 children so far

Here are just a few ways you've helped us to reach children affected by the crisis:

  • We've distributed food items to almost 40,000 children. This includes high-protein paste for malnourished children.
  • Around 3,000 are supported by our dedicated children's areas, which support their emotional wellbeing and give them a space to play and feel safe.
  • We provide support for children who have witnessed terrible atrocities, giving them a chance to being to recover from their experiences.
  • We've distributed hundreds of shelter kits, and are working to protect unaccompanied children from harm.
  • 370,000 people have received hygiene and clean water support, through our WASH programme. 
Majuma fled her village in Northern Rakhine State with her husband and one-and-a-half-year-old son, Rahmmot, after it was attacked.

Majuma fled her village in Northern Rakhine State with her husband and one-and-a-half-year-old son, Rahmmot, after it was attacked.

Majuma is pictured above with her son, Rahmmot.

She fled her village in Northern Rakhine State with her family, after it was attacked by the military.

Tired and scared, they travelled for five days on foot to reach Bangladesh. After arriving, they found shelter in one of the makeshift settlements. 

Thanks to supporters like you, we were able to distribute aid to Majuma and her family. They received a distribution kit, which included shelter supplies, food and basic kitchen and hygiene items.

Now they live in a basic shelter made of bamboo and plastic with Majuma’s husband and mother in law.

 

There's still more to do

Your generosity makes our vital work possible. Unfortunately, this emergency is still taking place. 

It's estimated that by the end of 2017 Bangladesh will likely host over 1 million Rohingya, if the influx continues. 

Such large numbers will exacerbate the issues already faced by many Rohingya people who are staying in makeshift camps. 

Watch Hanida's story below to see how her children, and children like hers, are still stuck in troubling conditions. 

 

As numbers increase, so does the risk of disease. Waterborne illnesses, such as cholera, can spread very quickly through crowded settlements. 

This is partially because access to safe water and sanitation is lacking, and as more Rohingya arrive, there's not enough space for new shelters. 

The safety and security of children travelling alone is also at risk. 1,304 unaccompanied and separated children have been identified so far, with more to be expected.

 

Once again, thank you

We're so grateful to all our supporters for their generosity. Thank you. Please spread the word about our Rohingya crisis appeal to help us raise more money, so that we can continue to be there for children.

Share our appeal page now