Rohingya Crisis Appeal

three in four children are being denied an education

Over 700,000 Rohingya people have fled Myanmar since August 2017, escaping unimaingable horrors - shootings, rapes and abuses.

Crossing the border into Bangladesh, most arrived in a state of shock, grief and exhaustion, carrying nothing but the clothes on their back. Now, they are battling the daily challenges of life in the cramped and unsanitary refugee camps. More than half of those living in the camps are children. 

Many families are reliant on food rations to survive. They need access to safe water and healthcare. Three in four children are out of school. And there is a major risk of an outbreak of disease. 

Please donate to our Rohingya Crisis Appeal

 

OUR RESPONSE

  • Our Emergency Health Unit - a network of health and logistics experts - was deployed last year to respond to the urgent medical needs of those arriving in Bangladesh. 
  • Since, we have established ten health facilities, including a 24/7 inpatient health centre, where we're treating sick and injured children and supporting the safe delivering of new borns. 
  • We're also treating children with severe acute malnutrition and providing Vitamin A supplements and nutrition advice to families. 
  • We've installed toilets and bathing units and are distributing essential hygiene items so children can keep clean and healthy. 
Just one week after Save the Children opened the first inpatient health centre, the first baby was delivered on our maternity ward – mother Humaira* gave birth to baby Rozina*.

Just one week after Save the Children opened the first inpatient health centre, the first baby was delivered on our maternity ward – mother Humaira* gave birth to baby Rozina*.

  • We're providing food and shelter to children who are hungry and scared.
  • We provided rope, tarpaulin and bamboo to upgrade shelters in the monsoon season so they could withstand the harsh conditions. 
Five-year-old, Fatema* in her makeshift shelter received food at one of our distributions.

Five-year-old, Fatema* in her makeshift shelter received food at one of our distributions.

 

  • We've set up Child Friendly Spaces and Girl Friendly Spaces - protected areas where children can learn, play and just be children again.
  • We're running awareness sessions with community leaders, parents and children on issues like child labour, child marriage and trafficking.
  • We're providing emotional and pyschosocial support to children to help them come to terms with the traumatic experiences they've been through.
  • We're reuniting families who have been separated from their children.
Save the Children psychosocial case worker, follows up with Marium* (11) and Ayesha*(9). The sisters now live with their uncle's family after their father died during the violence in Myanmar.

Save the Children psychosocial case worker, follows up with Marium* (11) and Ayesha*(9). The sisters now live with their uncle's family after their father died during the violence in Myanmar.

  • We've set up temporary learning centres so children can continue their right to an education.
  • We're distributing teaching and learning materials so children have everything they need to learn.
  • We're training teachers to identify children in need of health, nutrition or psychosocial care.
A Save the Children temporary learning centre in Cox's Bazar refugee camp.

A Save the Children temporary learning centre in Cox's Bazar refugee camp.

one year on

More than a year has passed since we launched our Rohingya Crisis emergency appeal. We've had huge impact so far thanks to our incredible supporters. Watch how Save the Children has helped so far.

More ways to get involved