How your money helps

By raising money for Save the Children, you'll help change children's lives. Every year, we ensure that millions of children can grow up safe and healthy, with the chance to learn. In 2016 alone we helped 22.1 million children. Their stories show the amazing difference your fundraising could make.

Saving children’s lives

Today, Bishara is a smiling five-year-old. But at 15 months old, she almost died from hunger.

Drought had left families across East Africa struggling to find food.

Weakened by malnutrition, little Bishara had become seriously ill. She had a high fever and was suffering from vomiting and diarrhoea. Her grandma, Amina, worried that she would die.

But, thanks to our supporters, our team in Wajir, north-eastern Kenya, was able to save Bishara’s life.

We treated her with medicine and high-nutrient food. When she was well enough to go home, we gave her weekly check-ups until she was strong again.

Delivering vital healthcare

When a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, Sabita was eight months pregnant.

Her home was destroyed and she was worried about the safety of her baby.

Luckily, our emergency team had set up a health clinic nearby to help people affected by the earthquake. So, when Sabita's baby came, she got the best possible care.

With her delivery attended by an experienced doctor and nurse, baby Phurpu was born safely.

Dr Ghimire, who oversaw the birth, said: "It always feels very fulfilling to help bring a new life into the world, but this birth felt extra special."

Supporting families

Cibado and her family used to struggle to survive on just a few pounds a day.

They live in a camp for displaced people in Hargeisa, Somaliland.

“Our life was difficult," Cibado says. “Sometimes we skipped meals.”

Cibado’s son dropped out of school and started living on the streets - until Save the Children staff found him and brought him home.

Then, we gave Cibado a grant to set up a small shop. “Now I’m able to work and look after my children,” she says. “Our life has changed for the better.”

Back to school

Five-year-old Fouad has a muscle disease that means he can’t walk or stand.

His family fled the civil war in Syria to Jordan. Before Fouad got his wheelchair, it was hard for him to make friends. 

Now, Fouad comes to our Rainbow Kindergarten in Za’atari refugee camp. It gives him the chance to meet other children and learn to read, count and draw.

His mum, Kefah, says it’s changed his life.

I can’t describe the state of joy that took over him after his first day,” she told us. "At the kindergarten my son was taught to see himself as gifted rather than disabled. And he quickly made many friends.”

Keeping children safe

Moussa doesn’t know how old he is.

When our team found Moussa (third from the right), he was living alone on the streets of Dakar, Senegal.

“The street was not good, it was very cold,” he says. “I had to beg for food. I had no shoes and had wounds on my feet. I used to sleep on the floor.”

Now, Moussa lives at a special shelter for vulnerable children supported by Save the Children. Here, he's able to play, learn and make friends in safety.

“When I came here, I was relieved,” he says. "I feel comfortable in this centre.”
 

Last updated: June 2016.